Nanaimo artist finds beauty in the sea creatures (jelly fish) found at Neck Point Park, Nanaimo, BC

My first solo art show!
Yay! I had the show several years ago, but I never figured out how to add it into my blog. Now I have and so here it is.

“I see gold” solo art show. Here are some paintings of the beautiful and amazing jelly fish I painted.

From left to right: Looking through the jellyfish painting, Looking through the jellyfish and visualizing sea shells and bits of gold

and rocks by the sea shore. Photos I took of the beautiful sea creature laying on the rocks. The last on the right is an abstract of anything you want it to be…

Ocean view Large Abstract Red painting by Lena Rasmussen, Rocks with Barnacles painting, Looking through the huge jellyfish painting at Neck Point Park, Nanaimo, BC Vancouver Island, BC
The red painting “I sea red” I painted for an art show. The theme was ‘red’. The rocks with barnacles painting was from a photo I took and mixed with some of my imagination. I really love painting rocks and barnacles. The painting on the right was how I remembered seeing gold through the jelly fish that was laying on some rocks near Neck Point Park, Nanaimo, BC, Vancouver Island
Lena Rasmussen Art show Rock and Barnacle paintings, jelly fish paintings,  Nanaimo, BC
In the first painting here, I am visualizing what it looks like looking through the jelly fish and seeing gold. Then I have two photos I took of the jelly fish. The 2nd painting is an abstract of ? and then some other black and white photos and a smaller painting of stones on a beach.
Large Blue Abstract painting by Lena Rasmussen Nanaimo, BC Barnacles and jellyfish
The larger blue painting  ©
 I visualized looking under the water and seeing to the surface. Barnacles again on the rocks. I love living by the ocean!
Here are some of my smaller poppy paintings. ©   They're whimsical and also from my imagination. I painted some coffee beans, olives and cherries. I painted some starfish I photographed on Newcastle Island just across the water from Nanaimo. Here is one of my sunflowers paintings. In the meantime, I have repainted the background with an aqua teal color.
Here are some of my smaller poppy paintings. ©
They’re whimsical and also from my imagination. I painted some coffee beans, olives and cherries. I painted some starfish I photographed on Newcastle Island just across the water from Nanaimo. Here is one of my sunflowers paintings. In the meantime, I have repainted the background with an aqua teal color.

Some photos I've taken of the jelly fish that inspired me to paint for my first one woman art show 'I see gold'. By Lena Rasmussen paints small poppy paintings
Some photos I’ve taken of the jelly fish that inspired me to paint for my first one woman art show ‘I see gold’.

Below is a newspaper article on my art show.

Note: I have copied this article and I am sharing from: The Daily News (Nanaimo) December 18, 2008 –
© (c) CanWest MediaWorks Publications Inc.
http://www.canada.com/nanaimodailynews/story.html?id=edb811b4-34a2-4acf-aa81-895bdfe6efc3

Nanaimo artist finds beauty in the sea creatures

Vancouver Islanders have spotted waves of jelly fish stretched along shorelines this fall, including Nanaimo artist, Lena Rasmussen, who found beauty in the sea creatures. She created an entire art series based on her findings during a stroll near Neck Point Park in late August.

By The Daily News (Nanaimo) December 18, 2008
Vancouver Islanders have spotted waves of jelly fish stretched along shorelines this fall, including Nanaimo artist, Lena Rasmussen, who found beauty in the sea creatures. She created an entire art series based on her findings during a stroll near Neck Point Park in late August.
Rasmussen officially launched the work earlier this month and her acrylic paintings remain on display at the Nanaimo Arts Council gallery for the rest of the month.
The concept for the ‘I See Gold’ series began when she walked the edge of the water and saw several people poking at several flat blobs of jelly about the size of a large dinner plate. People all over the Island and the Mainland have spotted similar findings this year.
Ocean tour companies reported seeing clusters of about 30 in the water, while residents from various shores came across groups of 20 in some instances, according to Canwest News Service.
The sightings in Nanaimo intrigued Rasmussen who took photographs, created her own colours from acrylic paint and immediately went to work. Painting relieves her of the chronic pain she experiences in her muscles and joints. The cancer survivor suffers from a list of illnesses that doctors can do little about, including severe endometriosis, arthritis and fibromyalgia.
Rasmussen wanted to capture the “gold” images she could see while staring at the reddish-brown jelly puddles.
“I swear it looked like I could see gold shimmering through its jellied body,” she said.
“It was the way the light was shining on and through it. I had to paint its beauty.”
The cyanea capillata jellyfish are at the top of a four-year population cycle, according to a marine biologist working in Nanaimo.
Their lifespan starts in the spring and matures in early September when they drift ashore and die.
They occupy waters from the mouth of the Fraser River to Comox and through the Juan de Fuca Strait as far as Sooke.
Long tentacles stretch and flow, collecting food while drifting in the water’s current; on shore, they cannot survive.
Rasmussen wanted to depict the gold images she could see underneath the blobs, as if “you were looking right through them,” she explained.
Her paintings will be displayed in the arts council gallery at the Nanaimo North Town Centre shopping mall until the end of the year.

 

 

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